Environment May 18
Introduction: UAntwerp and partners analysed the multiple impacts of energy efficiency in the European Horizon 2020-project COMBI. Saving energy not only improves the climate but also has positive impacts on air pollution, health, and ecosystems.
Medicine May 10

Researchers and clinicians at VIB, KU Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven have identified a genetic mutation that causes a rare form of the autoimmune disease lupus.

Media May 3

Communication scientists show that word choice in media reports on suicide has a measurable impact on public opinion.

Agronomy May 7

Introduction: On May 1st, 2018, Els Lecoutere presented her research on the Flemish public television broadcaster, the VRT (Vlaamse Radio -en Televisieomroeporganisatie).

Astronomy May 2

Stephen Hawking's last paper, co-authored by Thomas Hertog, does away with the infinite multiverse and predicts a simpler and finite universe.


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Results 1 - 20 of 38.


Environment / Sustainable Development - Business / Economics - 18.05.2018
Saving energy not only improves the climate
Introduction: UAntwerp and partners analysed the multiple impacts of energy efficiency in the European Horizon 2020-project COMBI. Saving energy not only improves the climate but also has positive impacts on air pollution, health, and ecosystems. Resource consumption, the economy and energy security also add benefits.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.05.2018
Scientists uncover new genetic cause of lupus
Researchers and clinicians at VIB, KU Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven have identified a genetic mutation that causes a rare form of the autoimmune disease lupus. They discovered the mutation in one Belgian family's DNA. Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, meaning that the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues.

Agronomy / Food Science - 07.05.2018
Translating my research into Smurf
Introduction: On May 1st, 2018, Els Lecoutere presented her research on the Flemish public television broadcaster, the VRT (Vlaamse Radio -en Televisieomroeporganisatie). If you think of a dull science documentary, you got it wrong... She explained how gender and power relations influence collective action in Smurfs' land.

Media - Social Sciences - 03.05.2018
What’s in a name: how language influences our perception of suicide
Communication scientists show that word choice in media reports on suicide has a measurable impact on public opinion. In an empirical study published in Social Science & Medicine , an international team of researchers from the University of Munich, KU Leuven and the Medical University of Vienna show that the specific German word used in media reports of suicides has a measurable impact on how readers perceive and evaluate the act of suicide.

Astronomy - Physics / Materials Science - 02.05.2018
Stephen Hawking and Thomas Hertog propose a new cosmological theory
Stephen Hawking's last paper, co-authored by Thomas Hertog, does away with the infinite multiverse and predicts a simpler and finite universe. Find out more in this ERC interview with Thomas Hertog.† You put forward a new theory of the origin of the universe. What's wrong with the current one? "The prevailing theory of the Big Bang is called eternal inflation.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2018
I did the first long-term study investigating illegal ivory traders. Here’s what I learned
Introduction: Kristof Titeca (UAntwerp) about illicit ivory trade (Washington Post). As if Mark Zuckerberg didn't have enough to worry about, Facebook is being accused of harboring yet another illicit activity: making it easy for international wildlife traffickers to sell elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger teeth, reports the Associated Press.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.04.2018
Let’s talk about sex chromosomes and stem cells
Scientists from KU Leuven and UCLA reveal why male and female cells behave differently after being reprogrammed into stem cells. Using a patient's skin cells to restore his vision? Thanks to a promising technique known as cell reprogramming, this science fiction scenario may soon become reality. The technique allows scientists to make stem cells from, for instance, a patient's skin cells.

Chemistry - 16.04.2018
Scientists develop herb passports for beer brewery
The traditional pint is increasingly losing ground to speciality beers. Using herbs is one of the ways to give these beers their specific flavour. Research shows that the taste of these herbs depends a great deal on where they are grown and on their harvest year. Brewers can use this knowledge to maintain the flavour†and quality of their product.

Earth Sciences - 12.04.2018
Lavas in the lab could lead miners to new iron ore deposits
Geologists have discovered that some magmas split into two separate liquids, one of which is very rich in iron. Their findings can help to discover new iron ore deposits for mining. Iron ore is mined in about 50 countries, with Australia, Brazil and China as the largest producers. It is mostly used to produce the steel objects that are all around us - from paper clips to kitchen appliances and the supporting beams in skyscrapers.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 30.03.2018
Protecting biodiversity, at the same time battling climate change?
Introduction: Biodiversity decline and climate warming are two important challenges for mankind. New research shows the possibility to address both problems at the same time, in the tropical rain forest. That is the core message a team of Belgian scientists brought along, back from an expedition in the rain forest of the DR Congo.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 09.03.2018
Newly described process in Parkinson’s protein as a potential new therapy route
Approximately 4 million people worldwide currently suffer from Parkinson's disease, and this number is only expected to increase. The most frequent genetic causes of the illness are mutations in the gene responsible for controlling the production of protein LRRK2, which includes two enzymes: a kinase and a GTPase.

Physics / Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering / Mechanics - 09.03.2018
Combining scientific languages to create an invisibility cloak
An assistant professor at Brussels' Vrije Universiteit and a visiting professor at Harvard, Vincent Ginis is a brilliant scientist who won a Solvay Award in 2014 and was designated as one of the top 50 tech pioneers in Belgium in 2017. His particular area of study is optics, but he makes a strong case for the combination of different scientific disciplines, or “languages”, to drive progress in research.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 08.03.2018
Got the message? Your brainwaves will tell
The new technique was developed by Professor Tom Francart and his colleagues from the Department of Neurosciences at KU Leuven in collaboration with the University of Maryland. It will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of patients who cannot actively participate in a speech understanding test†because they're too young, for instance, or because they're in a coma.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Chemistry - 02.03.2018
Fish consumption and exposure to methylmercury
Fish consumption and exposure to methylmercury
A study conducted by a team of international researchers, including Krishna Das from the Laboratory of Biological Oceanology ( FOCUS Research Unit), presents new data on the level of mercury in seven distinct populations of European seabass ( Dicentrarchus labrax ), an edible species whose flesh is highly appreciated by gourmets.

Chemistry - Physics / Materials Science - 28.02.2018
Oligorotaxanes, artificial molecular machines capable of exceeding the performance of natural proteins
Researchers at the NANOCHEM laboratory (MolSys Research Unit) of the University of Liege have studied molecules synthesized by Sir Fraser Stoddart's group, Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry 2016 and professor at Northwestern University. The results obtained during this research and published in Nature Nanotechnology (1) open up new paths in the use of molecular machines, these synthetic molecules that carry out controlled motion on demand.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 26.02.2018
"Young buds freeze out because of warming of the planet"
Introduction: International team researches frost damage because of warming climate. At first glance, one might think that plants have a reduced chance to suffer frost damage, as Earth warms. But appearances can be deceiving, as a new study shows, to which UAntwerp researchers Ivan Janssens and Yongshuo Fu contributed.

Astronomy - Media - 22.02.2018
What have we learned about TRAPPIST-1 during this last year?
Just a year ago, on the 22 February 2017, at a press conference at NASA headquarters, an international team of researchers revealed the existence of a unique exoplanetary system, made up of seven planets orbiting a small nearby star. Known as TRAPPIST-1, this system created a hug buzz on the Web, in the media, and within the scientific community.

Life Sciences - 22.02.2018
Could the interneuron migration explain macrocephaly?
Interneuron migration controls cerebral cortical growth and its impairement could lead to macrocephaly A team from the University of LiŤge has discovered a new crosstalk between the migrating inhibitory interneurons and the stem cells that generate the excitatory neurons. The researchers discovered that this cellular dialogue controls the growth of the cerebral cortex and that its impairment leads a cortical malformation previously associated with autism in mice.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.02.2018
Fifteen new genes identified that shape our face
Researchers from KU Leuven and the universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, and Penn State (US) have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features. The findings were published. Our DNA determines what we look like, including our facial features. That appeals to the popular imagination, as the potential applications are obvious.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 14.02.2018
Heavy bones, low body weight: scientists discover new link between bone cells and blood sugar level
Bone cells do not just form new bone, they also influence the blood sugar level. Leuven scientists have now discovered a new mechanism that controls this link. The metabolism of bone cells determines how much sugar they use; if the bone cells consume more sugar than normal, this can lower the glucose level in the blood.