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Environment - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have? Recent work by UNamur researchers answers this question, and has just been published in the journal Environment International. This work is the fruit of a three-year collaboration with Mithra, a Belgian biotech company committed to transforming women's health with innovative alternatives, particularly in contraception, funded by SPW Research.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
Deep stimulation of the human brain: a new non-invasive technique EPFL-UCLouvain
Scientists at EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne), led by Prof. Friedhelm C. Hummel and post-doctoral fellow Pierre Vassiliadis (EPFL and UCLouvain Institute of Neuroscience), have successfully tested a new technique enabling deep stimulation of the human brain, without surgery or implants, for potential therapeutic purposes.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Genetic risk scores for Parkinson’s for precision medicine approach
An interdisciplinary team from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg, together with international collaborators, established that a combination of small variations in genes regulating mitochondria, an important component of human cells, is associated with a higher risk for Parkinson's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.04.2024
Once upon a time, there was a cerebral blood vessel...
Once upon a time, there was a cerebral blood vessel...
A ULB team has discovered how blood vessels in the brain are formed and how they differ from other vessels in the body. A major breakthrough that could lead to new therapeutic approaches . Cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction and stroke, is the world's leading cause of death, claiming around 18 million lives a year.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.03.2024
XCT protein is key link in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth and limiting mood disturbances
XCT protein is key link in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth and limiting mood disturbances
VUB researchers show xCT protein is key link in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth and limiting mood disturbances The xCT protein, which plays an important role as a transport molecule in the cell, could play a part in cancer treatment in the future, researchers at VUB have discovered. Their work is the result of a collaboration between the research groups of neuroscientist Ann Massie of the Laboratory of Neuro-Aging & Viro-Immunotherapy and pancreatic cancer expert Ilse Rooman of the Laboratory for Medical and Molecular Oncology.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2024
A mechanism for healthy brain development
A mechanism for healthy brain development
Scientists at UCLouvain have discovered that the balance between two proteins plays a decisive role in brain development. The study is published in the American Association for the Advancement of Science's (AAAS) prestigious journal Science Advances . During embryonic development, cells continuously receive numerous stimuli to which they react via intracellular signals.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.02.2024
Newly discovered protein blocks sleeping sickness
Newly discovered protein blocks sleeping sickness
Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people and is fatal if left untreated. Most treatments and preventative options, however, are not very effective. New research identifies a protein that could pave the way toward drugs against sleeping sickness.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.02.2024
Essential protein that contributes to liver fibrosis
Essential protein that contributes to liver fibrosis
Chronic liver disease is a serious global health problem that has a severe impact on personal quality of life. A major characteristic of chronic liver disease is liver fibrosis, where certain liver cells, called hepatic stellate cells, become activated and produce scar tissue that damages the liver. At present, no specific drugs are available to treat this condition, partly because we know too little about the activation process for the stellate cells, and no specific targets have been identified to date.