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Results 21 - 34 of 34.


Physics - 23.11.2023
Luttinger's theorem at the center of topology
Luttinger’s theorem at the center of topology
The laws of physics are based on universal principles, often associated with mathematical theorems. Identifying physical phenomena that escape these fundamental rules leads to a paradigm shift, and usually to major discoveries. In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, Lucila Peralta Gavensky, Nathan Goldman (Faculty of Science) and Subir Sachdev (Harvard), reveal a fundamental link between the violation of two major rules of solid-state physics: Luttinger's theorem and the classification rule for insulating materials .

Life Sciences - 23.11.2023
Rotifers: what explains the exceptional resistance of these microorganisms?
Rotifers: what explains the exceptional resistance of these microorganisms?
Bedeloid rotifers, those mysterious microorganisms, display remarkable resistance to desiccation, ionizing radiation and even freezing. Under the direction of Karine Van Doninck - Faculty of Science, a team of researchers is investigating the molecular basis of this exceptional resistance, making rotifers model animals for research .

Life Sciences - 20.11.2023
Thanks to KU Leuven, we now have better understanding of the worldwide diversity in cranial shape, and how deformations occur
Peter Claes has successfully identified the genetic factor that accounts for the large variation in the shape of human skulls and faces, before subsequently identifying which of these genes play an important role in the risk of craniosynostosis, a condition where the fibrous sutures of a baby's skull join together too early, preventing the skull from expanding as the brain develops and grows in the first two years of life.

Sport - 17.11.2023
Everyone on mindfulness at school? Little effect
Many young people struggle with somber feelings, stress or anxiety symptoms. In a large-scale study, with support from the Fund for Scientific Research Flanders (FWO) and in the context of Red Noses Day (now "Jez!"), KU Leuven investigated whether mindfulness at school could help. For eight weeks, several class groups in eleven Flemish secondary schools followed mindfulness training.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2023
VUB researcher develops three-dimensional model of the testis
VUB researcher develops three-dimensional model of the testis
Male fertility and reduced sperm quality plays a role in half of the cases of couples who cannot conceive. Research into the various causes of reduced sperm quality is hampered by incomplete knowledge of male reproductive biology. Therefore, Guillaume Richer of the Biology of the Testis research group at the Free University of Brussels developed a 3D model of the testis or testicle for his PhD study.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2023
First wireless map of worm’s nervous system revealed
Researchers have built the first ever map showing how every single neuron in the nervous system of a tiny worm communicates wirelessly. This huge step forward in understanding how neurons communicate through extremely short proteins called neuropeptides will help scientists understand how our emotions and mental states are controlled, as well as widespread neuropsychiatric conditions like eating disorders, OCD and PSTD.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 15.11.2023
James Webb Space Telescope detects water vapour, sulfur dioxide and sand clouds in the atmosphere of a nearby exoplanet
James Webb Space Telescope detects water vapour, sulfur dioxide and sand clouds in the atmosphere of a nearby exoplanet
A team of European astronomers, co-led by researchers from the Institute of Astronomy, KU Leuven, used recent observations made with the James Webb Space Telescope to study the atmosphere of the nearby exoplanet WASP-107b. Peering deep into the fluffy atmosphere of WASP-107b they discovered not only water vapour and sulfur dioxide, but even silicate sand clouds.

Health - 14.11.2023
VUB maps complexity of pancreatic tumours 
VUB maps complexity of pancreatic tumours 
Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumour that is very difficult to treat and has low survival rates. Previous studies show that there are two major subtypes of tumour: classical and basal. Basal tumours tend to be more aggressive and are more associated with invasion and metastasis. Much research is being carried out to determine whether the two subtypes respond differently to the most common chemotherapies, which would mean they should each receive targeted treatment.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2023
Next generation of fluorescent medical imaging
Next generation of fluorescent medical imaging
Researchers Maarten Kuijk and Hans Ingelberts of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel are leading the international European consortium CoDaFlight (Colouring the Dark in Fluorescent light). The consortium's aim is to lay the foundation for the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging in medical procedures such as image-guided surgery and monitoring disease-related processes.

Innovation - 07.11.2023
New hearing technology objectively measures how well a person understands speech
New hearing technology objectively measures how well a person understands speech
New software, developed at KU Leuven, can use brain waves to determine whether a person understands speech well. The researchers were able to successfully apply the technology for the first time to young, hearing-impaired children. In Flanders, one in a thousand infants come into the world with a severe hearing loss.

Paleontology - Environment - 31.10.2023
Fine particulates signalled the end of the dinosaurs
Fine particulates signalled the end of the dinosaurs
Fine dust from pulverised rock released by the impact of the Chicxulub meteorite 66 million years ago played a major role in climate cooling, disruption of photosynthesis and the mass extinction of dinosaurs, VUB researchers have found. Until now, the exact circumstances surrounding the mass extinction of the dinosaurs - such as the effect on the global climate of the material ejected by the meteorite's impact - have been unclear.

Paleontology - Environment - 30.10.2023
Fine particles heralded the end of the dinosaurs
Fine particles heralded the end of the dinosaurs
Fine dust from pulverized rock released by the Chicxulub meteorite impact 66 million years ago played a dominant role in the cooling of the climate, the disruption of photosynthesis and the mass extinction in which most dinosaurs went extinct. Until now, the precise circumstances of the mass extinction, such as the effect of the different types of impact material ejected from the crater on global climate were unclear .

Health - Life Sciences - 27.10.2023
Intercellular messengers start revealing themselves 
The cells in our body continuously keep each other informed. They do this by exchanging, among other things, virus-like vesicles. Pascale Zimmermann's group, from the Department of Human Genetics, has been studying these vesicles for many years. Her fundamental research is necessary to use these intercellular messengers in medicine.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.10.2023
FNRS researcher Tįrcius Nascimento Ramos publishes in the prestigious Journal of Chemical Physics
Knowing the energy of light absorbed by a molecule enables us to understand its structure, its quantum states, its interaction with other molecules and its potential technological applications. Molecules with a high probability of simultaneously absorbing two low-energy photons of light have a wide range of applications: as molecular probes in high-resolution microscopy, as substrates for data storage in dense three-dimensional structures or as vectors in medicinal treatments.