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Chemistry - 19.12.2022
Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning
A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry. Developed by researchers at Aalto University and the University of Luxembourg , the model was trained with data from dozens of laboratories to become one of the most accurate tools for identifying small molecules.

Chemistry - 29.11.2022
Iteroselectivity: the selectivity that organic chemistry was missing
Iteroselectivity: the selectivity that organic chemistry was missing
A new type of selectivity to better describe reactivity in organic chemistry has been conceptualized. Researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (LCO - ULB) have published their work in Cell Reports Physical Science. An important part of organic chemistry consists of the synthesis of products via a sequence of chemical reactions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 14.06.2022
Gaia mission sees strange stars in most detailed Milky Way survey to date
Gaia mission sees strange stars in most detailed Milky Way survey to date
The ESA Gaia mission has released its new treasure trove of data about our home galaxy. Astronomers - including Professor Conny Aerts from KU Leuven - describe strange 'starquakes', stellar DNA, asymmetric motions and other fascinating insights in this most detailed Milky Way survey to date. Gaia is ESA's mission to create the most accurate and complete multi-dimensional map of the Milky Way.

Environment - Chemistry - 13.10.2020
Researchers achieve breakthrough in production of ammonia without CO2 emissions
Researchers achieve breakthrough in production of ammonia without CO2 emissions
The production of ammonia - a very important chemical building block as part of synthetic fertilisers, among other things - is one of the main sources of CO2 emissions. By combining two different technologies, researchers from KU Leuven and the University of Antwerp have now discovered a CO2-free alternative.

Environment - Chemistry - 03.06.2020
Not too fast: a critique on biodegradation of plastics, especially by marcoorganisms such as caterpillars
Caterpillars can consume plastics, but it is not a magic solution. Caterpillars can consume plastics! Back in 2017, the world was getting to know this extraordinary phenomenon by global news coverage of findings of Bombelli et al. Their claims were that larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, consume polyethylene at an extraordinary rate, and moreover produce ethylene glycol as a major metabolite.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.05.2020
Exotic particles offer deeper insight into matter and antimatter
Exotic particles offer deeper insight into matter and antimatter
At the European nuclear and particle physics laboratory CERN, physicists can produce extremely rare short-lived atoms and molecules. Researchers from KU Leuven have shown that these particles lead the way to uncharted territory in nuclear and particle physics. One of the oldest active installations at the Centre for European Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva is the ISOLDE laboratory.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.04.2020
Molecular switch plays crucial role in learning from negative experiences
Neurobiologists at KU Leuven have discovered how the signalling molecule Neuromedin U plays a crucial role in our learning process. The protein allows the brain to recall negative memories and, as such, learn from the past. The findings of their study on roundworms have been published Communications.

Environment - Chemistry - 13.02.2020
From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: cost-efficient and more sustainable
From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: cost-efficient and more sustainable
An interdisciplinary team of bio-engineers and economists from KU Leuven has mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry. They not only looked at the technological requirements, but also whether that scenario would be financially viable. A shift from petroleum to wood would lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions, the researchers state in Science .

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 09.02.2020
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: archaeometry
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: archaeometry
Ghent's focus is on Van Eyck and the Ghent Altarpiece in 2020. Lots of people from Ghent University are also involved in this year of celebration. We have been putting a number of them in the spotlight. This week: Peter Vandenabeele. In Ghent, it's all about Van Eyck and the Ghent Altarpiece in 2020.

Physics - Chemistry - 04.01.2020
Clusters of gold atoms form peculiar pyramidal shape
Clusters of gold atoms form peculiar pyramidal shape
Freestanding clusters of twenty gold atoms take the shape of a pyramid, researchers discovered. This is in contrast with most elements, which organize themselves by forming shells around one central atom. The team of researchers led by KU Leuven published their findings in Science Advances . Clusters composed of a few atoms tend to be spherical.

Chemistry - 04.10.2019
Professor Veronique Van Speybroek in 'Women of Catalysis'
Professor Veronique Van Speybroek in ’Women of Catalysis’
Prof. Van Speybroek highlighted as one of the strong Women of Catalysis The ChemCatChem journal, one of the premier journals in the field of catalysis, highlights the strong contributions of women-lead research groups in Catalysis Science. They placed 67 strong female researchers in the picture in a special issue: "Woman of Catalysis".

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2019
Atomically thin micas as proton-conducting membranes
Inleiding: Recent work from CMT researchers (Dr Bacaksiz and Prof Peeters) provide theoretical support for experiments done in Manchester which show that micas are excellent proton conducting membranes. (Physworld News) One-atom thick materials like graphene (a 2D sheet of carbon) conduct protons extremely well but they become impermeable to protons the thicker they get.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 04.09.2019
New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips
Researchers at KU Leuven and imec have successfully developed a new technique to insulate microchips. The technique uses metal-organic frameworks, a new type of materials consisting of structured nanopores. In the long term, this method can be used for the development of even smaller and more powerful chips that consume less energy.

Environment - Chemistry - 16.04.2019
Antwerp researchers make anticancer medicines from wood
New process makes the production of pharmaceuticals more efficient and sustainable. In the near future, fossil raw materials can be replaced in the production of two important anticancer drugs. An interuniversity team with researchers from UAntwerp and KU Leuven developed a process that starts from ...

Chemistry - Environment - 25.03.2019
Looking past the hype: KU Leuven researchers shed more light on their hydrogen panel
Looking past the hype: KU Leuven researchers shed more light on their hydrogen panel
How did bioscience engineers at KU Leuven manage to convert water vapour directly into hydrogen gas, with record efficiency? And does their hydrogen panel signal the end of fossil fuels' We asked Johan Martens and Tom Bosserez from the Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis for the answers. Professor Johan Martens and his team have had some pretty hectic weeks.

Environment - Chemistry - 26.02.2019
KU Leuven scientists crack the code for affordable, eco-friendly hydrogen gas
KU Leuven scientists crack the code for affordable, eco-friendly hydrogen gas
Bioscience engineers at KU Leuven have created a solar panel that produces hydrogen gas from moisture in the air. After ten years of development, the panel can now produce 250 litres per day - a world record, according to the researchers. Twenty of these solar panels could provide electricity and heat for one family for an entire year.

Chemistry - 18.12.2018
KU Leuven researchers use sound waves to prevent small chemical reactors from clogging up 
Companies are keen to use miniature chemical reactors to make pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals, but are discouraged by their tendency to clog up. Researchers at KU Leuven have now devised an elegant way of using sound waves to keep the chemicals flowing. The chemical industry conventionally produces in large batches, but this approach has drawbacks.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 29.10.2018
A USB stick? In the distant future, a little powder should suffice
( 29-10-2018 ) Whether you think about bank accounts, YouTube videos or QR codes, everything is saved as zeros and ones, or data, on a computer. The storage equipment available might not be capable of holding all that information much longer. Ghent University successfully investigates alternative data storage methods There are two major issues.

Chemistry - Physics - 16.08.2018
Why silver clusters emit light
Clusters of silver atoms captured in zeolites, a porous material with small channels and voids, have remarkable light emitting properties. For instance, they can be used for more efficient lighting applications as a substitute for LED and TL lamps. Until recently, scientists did not know exactly how and why these small particles emit light.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.07.2018
Graphene smart membranes can control water
Graphene smart membranes can control water
Researchers have achieved a long-sought-after objective of electrically controlling water flow through membranes, as reported in Nature. This is the latest exciting membranes development benfitting from the unique properties of graphene. The new research opens up an avenue for developing smart membrane technologies and could revolutionise the field of artificial biological systems, tissue engineering and filtration.