Frogs use molecules that act as tiny fangs to get their poison into predators

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A team of researchers from the Amphibian Evolution lab at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and the Laboratory of Veterinary Bacteriology and Mycology at Ghent University has deciphered how poisonous frogs manage to intoxicate an attacking predator fast enough to avoid begin eaten. In a newly published article , they report on how frogs deliver their toxins to a predator's bloodstream by deploying a second set of molecules, that make the predator's mouth and gut permeable. Their findings show that besides large and obvious structures like a snake's fangs or a wasp's stinger, toxic animals can alternatively deploy molecules to administer their toxins.
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