news 2019

Health - Sep 19
Health
Researchers at KU Leuven have developed a new research model to grow and study the human variant of the norovirus. The virus could thus far only be studied through a variant that occurs in mice. The new model, that is described in the journal PLOS Pathogens, should allow researchers to develop a treatment for stomach flu.
Pharmacology - Sep 16

The University of Antwerp is coordinating a European project to increase efficiency in drug detection With the NarcoReader, the University of Antwerp is collaborating with its international partners to develop a high-tech device that is intended to make the detection of drugs quite a bit more efficient.

Physics - Sep 11

Inleiding: Recent work from CMT researchers (Dr Bacaksiz and Prof Peeters) provide theoretical support for experiments done in Manchester which show that micas are excellent proton conducting membranes.

Pharmacology - Sep 11

Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. This approach is much cheaper and more efficient than producing antibodies industrially and administering them afterwards.

Materials Science - Sep 4

Researchers at KU Leuven and imec have successfully developed a new technique to insulate microchips. The technique uses metal-organic frameworks, a new type of materials consisting of structured nanopores.


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Health - Pharmacology - 19.09.2019
One step closer to treating and preventing stomach flu thanks to new research model
One step closer to treating and preventing stomach flu thanks to new research model
Researchers at KU Leuven have developed a new research model to grow and study the human variant of the norovirus. The virus could thus far only be studied through a variant that occurs in mice. The new model, that is described in the journal PLOS Pathogens, should allow researchers to develop a treatment for stomach flu.

Pharmacology - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
Drugs cannot escape the NarcoReader
The University of Antwerp is coordinating a European project to increase efficiency in drug detection With the NarcoReader, the University of Antwerp is collaborating with its international partners to develop a high-tech device that is intended to make the detection of drugs quite a bit more efficient.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.09.2019
Can a DNA construction kit replace expensive antibody medication?
Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. This approach is much cheaper and more efficient than producing antibodies industrially and administering them afterwards. The study in animals with a similar size as humans brings us a step closer to the clinical use of antibody gene therapy.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2019
Atomically thin micas as proton-conducting membranes
Inleiding: Recent work from CMT researchers (Dr Bacaksiz and Prof Peeters) provide theoretical support for experiments done in Manchester which show that micas are excellent proton conducting membranes. (Physworld News) One-atom thick materials like graphene (a 2D sheet of carbon) conduct protons extremely well but they become impermeable to protons the thicker they get.

Materials Science - Physics - 04.09.2019
New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips
Researchers at KU Leuven and imec have successfully developed a new technique to insulate microchips. The technique uses metal-organic frameworks, a new type of materials consisting of structured nanopores. In the long term, this method can be used for the development of even smaller and more powerful chips that consume less energy.

Materials Science - Physics - 28.08.2019
Next generation synthetic covalent 2-D materials unveiled
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr. Mehmet Yagmurcukardes and Prof. Francois Peeters, in collaboration with a team from Manchester have uncovered novel 2D materials. (Nanowerk News) A team of researchers at the National Graphene Institute at The University of Manchester have developed a new method to synthesize 2D materials that are thought to be impossible or, at least, unobtainable by current technologies.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.08.2019
Hydrogen induces high-temperature superconductivity in a monolayer material
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr Jonas Bekaert and Prof Milorad Milosevic, in collaboration with Swedish researchers have predicted that a atomically thin layer of hydrogen will boost the critical temperature of a thin superconductor to above a hundred kelvin. Hydrogen-rich bulk superconducting materials have recently exhibited record-breaking critical temperatures, nearing the ambient temperature and thereby promising a major technological impact on the society.

Environment - 19.08.2019
Can animals sufficiently adapt to climate change?
A new study shows that in multiple animal species climate change causes changes in the life cycle, e.g. the timing of the egg hatching, or adaptations in their morphology, e.g. body size. GCE scientists Frank Adriaensen and Erik Matthysen have contributed to a newly published article in the interdisciplinary science.

Sport - Computer Science / Telecom - 09.08.2019
Messi v Ronaldo: who’s the GOAT? Computer model may help to settle the debate
Researchers at KU Leuven and data intelligence company SciSports have developed a new algorithm to assess football players' on-the-ball actions. Their model goes beyond traditional player statistics like the number of goals and assists, offering a more complete assessment of a player's performance and contribution to his team.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.08.2019
Researchers use CRISPR/Cas to repair two mutations of the cystic fibrosis gene
Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven and the University of Trento have used gene correction to fix two mutations that cause cystic fibrosis. The breakthrough involved a petri dish with 3D cell structures, or organoids, from cystic fibrosis patients. Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetic disorder in Belgium.

Health - 07.08.2019
24-hour blood pressure monitoring is the best way to predict cardiovascular diseases
An international study led by Professor Jan Staessen and Professor Zhen-Yu Zhang has shown that 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, including when the patient is asleep, has the highest predictive accuracy for cardiovascular diseases.  An international consortium followed 11,135 individuals for up to 14 years.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.08.2019
Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish
Biomedical researchers at KU Leuven have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs. Diseases of the endometrium are an important cause of infertility.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
By stabilizing perovskites -man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity- they absorb sunlight and can be used in efficient solar panels. Perovskites are semiconductor materials that have many applications. They show particular promise in harvesting solar energy. Currently, most solar cells are made with silicon crystals, a relatively straightforward and effective material to process for this purpose.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
A study led by KU Leuven for the first time explains how a promising type of perovskites - man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity - can be stabilised. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2019
Understanding people gets harder when you’re over 50, even when you have good hearing
Older people have trouble understanding speech, even if their hearing is fine. That's one of the conclusions of a new study by the Research Group Experimental Oto-rhino-laryngology (ExpORL) of KU Leuven. The results underline the importance of tests to measure if people with seemingly normal hearing have really understood a message.

Environment - Politics - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
A new study finds that climate has affected the risk of armed conflict. Though other drivers of violence were found to be substantially more influential, as global temperatures continue to rise, the changing climate is expected to further amplify the risk of conflict. Can a changing climate trigger organised armed conflict, such as civil war, or make it more severe?

Pharmacology - Health - 12.06.2019
New vulnerability found in viruses may help develop cure for the common cold
A team of researchers led by KU Leuven virologist Johan Neyts have discovered a new feature of so-called picornaviruses that may allow for the development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses. Picornaviruses include rhinoviruses and enteroviruses. Rhinoviruses cause millions of cases of upper respiratory infections ("colds") yearly and contribute to asthma, and enteroviruses are responsible for millions of infections including cases such as meningitis, encephalitis and polio.

Life Sciences - 11.06.2019
From face to DNA: new method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database
Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database, as an international team led by KU Leuven has shown. Their findings were published. Our physical appearance, including our face, is hardwired into our genetic material.

- 05.06.2019
Candidate polio vaccines are safe and immunogenic
The Lancet reports on a unique polio studio by the University of Antwerp Findings from the first-in-human study of a new polio vaccine - novel oral polio vaccine, or nOPV - reported in The Lancet this week are promising. If subsequent studies are successful, such a vaccine has the potential to supplement current eradication efforts and sustain eradication of all types of polioviruses for the long-term.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.06.2019
Towards a new era of small animal imaging research
A collaborative study between the University of Antwerp and McGill University allows PET scanning on animals without the use of anesthesia. Have you ever spent half an hour trying to take the best photo of your pets but they won't stay still in the perfect angle? This is also true for small animal imaging research using positron emission tomography (PET).
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