Physics - Aug 19
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr Jonas Bekaert and Prof Milorad Milosevic, in collaboration with Swedish researchers have predicted that a atomically thin layer of hydrogen will boost the critical temperature of a thin superconductor to above a hundred kelvin. Hydrogen-rich bulk superconducting materials have recently exhibited record-breaking critical temperatures, nearing the ambient temperature and thereby promising a major technological impact on the society.
Environment - Aug 19

A new study shows that in multiple animal species climate change causes changes in the life cycle, e.g. the timing of the egg hatching, or adaptations in their morphology, e.g. body size.

Life Sciences - Aug 9

Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven and the University of Trento have used gene correction to fix two mutations that cause cystic fibrosis. The breakthrough involved a petri dish with 3D cell structures, or organoids, from cystic fibrosis patients.

Sport - Aug 9

Researchers at KU Leuven and data intelligence company SciSports have developed a new algorithm to assess football players' on-the-ball actions. Their model goes beyond traditional player statistics like the number of goals and assists, offering a more complete assessment of a player's performance and contribution to his team.

Health - Aug 7

An international study led by Professor Jan Staessen and Professor Zhen-Yu Zhang has shown that 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, including when the patient is asleep, has the highest predictive accuracy for cardiovascular diseases.


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Physics - Materials Science - 19.08.2019
Hydrogen induces high-temperature superconductivity in a monolayer material
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr Jonas Bekaert and Prof Milorad Milosevic, in collaboration with Swedish researchers have predicted that a atomically thin layer of hydrogen will boost the critical temperature of a thin superconductor to above a hundred kelvin. Hydrogen-rich bulk superconducting materials have recently exhibited record-breaking critical temperatures, nearing the ambient temperature and thereby promising a major technological impact on the society.

Environment - 19.08.2019
Can animals sufficiently adapt to climate change?
A new study shows that in multiple animal species climate change causes changes in the life cycle, e.g. the timing of the egg hatching, or adaptations in their morphology, e.g. body size. GCE scientists Frank Adriaensen and Erik Matthysen have contributed to a newly published article in the interdisciplinary science.

Sport - Computer Science / Telecom - 09.08.2019
Messi v Ronaldo: who’s the GOAT? Computer model may help to settle the debate
Researchers at KU Leuven and data intelligence company SciSports have developed a new algorithm to assess football players' on-the-ball actions. Their model goes beyond traditional player statistics like the number of goals and assists, offering a more complete assessment of a player's performance and contribution to his team.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.08.2019
Researchers use CRISPR/Cas to repair two mutations of the cystic fibrosis gene
Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven and the University of Trento have used gene correction to fix two mutations that cause cystic fibrosis. The breakthrough involved a petri dish with 3D cell structures, or organoids, from cystic fibrosis patients. Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetic disorder in Belgium.

Health - 07.08.2019
24-hour blood pressure monitoring is the best way to predict cardiovascular diseases
An international study led by Professor Jan Staessen and Professor Zhen-Yu Zhang has shown that 24-hour blood pressure monitoring, including when the patient is asleep, has the highest predictive accuracy for cardiovascular diseases.  An international consortium followed 11,135 individuals for up to 14 years.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.08.2019
Endometrial diseases can be imitated in a lab dish
Biomedical researchers at KU Leuven have found a new way to study endometrial diseases such as endometriosis and cancer. They were able to grow three-dimensional cell structures from diseased tissue of patients. The biobank can be used to unravel the disorders and test drugs. Diseases of the endometrium are an important cause of infertility.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
By stabilizing perovskites -man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity- they absorb sunlight and can be used in efficient solar panels. Perovskites are semiconductor materials that have many applications. They show particular promise in harvesting solar energy. Currently, most solar cells are made with silicon crystals, a relatively straightforward and effective material to process for this purpose.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
A study led by KU Leuven for the first time explains how a promising type of perovskites - man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity - can be stabilised. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2019
Understanding people gets harder when you’re over 50, even when you have good hearing
Older people have trouble understanding speech, even if their hearing is fine. That's one of the conclusions of a new study by the Research Group Experimental Oto-rhino-laryngology (ExpORL) of KU Leuven. The results underline the importance of tests to measure if people with seemingly normal hearing have really understood a message.

Environment - Politics - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
A new study finds that climate has affected the risk of armed conflict. Though other drivers of violence were found to be substantially more influential, as global temperatures continue to rise, the changing climate is expected to further amplify the risk of conflict. Can a changing climate trigger organised armed conflict, such as civil war, or make it more severe?

Pharmacology - Health - 12.06.2019
New vulnerability found in viruses may help develop cure for the common cold
A team of researchers led by KU Leuven virologist Johan Neyts have discovered a new feature of so-called picornaviruses that may allow for the development of new antiviral medications for the common cold, polio, and other illnesses. Picornaviruses include rhinoviruses and enteroviruses. Rhinoviruses cause millions of cases of upper respiratory infections ("colds") yearly and contribute to asthma, and enteroviruses are responsible for millions of infections including cases such as meningitis, encephalitis and polio.

Life Sciences - 11.06.2019
From face to DNA: new method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database
Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database, as an international team led by KU Leuven has shown. Their findings were published. Our physical appearance, including our face, is hardwired into our genetic material.

- 05.06.2019
Candidate polio vaccines are safe and immunogenic
The Lancet reports on a unique polio studio by the University of Antwerp Findings from the first-in-human study of a new polio vaccine - novel oral polio vaccine, or nOPV - reported in The Lancet this week are promising. If subsequent studies are successful, such a vaccine has the potential to supplement current eradication efforts and sustain eradication of all types of polioviruses for the long-term.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.06.2019
Towards a new era of small animal imaging research
A collaborative study between the University of Antwerp and McGill University allows PET scanning on animals without the use of anesthesia. Have you ever spent half an hour trying to take the best photo of your pets but they won't stay still in the perfect angle? This is also true for small animal imaging research using positron emission tomography (PET).

History / Archeology - 20.05.2019
Facial reconstruction breathes new life into ancient citizens of Sagalassos
A look into the past. It's usually just a metaphor, but archaeologists Jeroen Poblome and Sam Cleymans have made it a physical reality. Together with the University of Burdur, Turkey, they have reconstructed the faces of two centuries-old residents of Sagalassos. For over thirty years, KU Leuven researchers have been examining the archaeological site of Sagalassos with an international and interdisciplinary team.

Computer Science / Telecom - 14.05.2019
Critical vulnerability in Intel processors
Researchers from the Department of Computer Science have helped to expose a security flaw in Intel processors. More than 80 per cent of all computers and servers use these processors. The security flaw makes the hardware vulnerable to hackers. "Our research focuses on designing secure computer processors, among other things," says Jo Van Bulck from the KU Leuven Department of Computer Science.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 08.05.2019
Knowledge for Growth 2019
5 Flemish universities reveal innovative state-of-the-art biotech research No less than 25 technologies in drug screening, therapy development, MedTech, digital health and AI will be showcased or pitched by the five Flemish universities at Europe's leading life sciences conference in Ghent.

Astronomy / Space Science - Music - 06.05.2019
Blue supergiant stars open doors to concert in space
Blue supergiants are rock 'n' roll: they live fast and die young. This makes them rare and difficult to study. Before space telescopes were invented, few blue supergiants had been observed, so our knowledge of these stars was limited. Using recent NASA space telescope data, an international team led by KU Leuven studied the sounds originating inside these stars and discovered that almost all blue supergiants shimmer in brightness because of waves on their surface.

Computer Science / Telecom - 25.04.2019
KU Leuven researchers make themselves invisible to AI cameras
A cardboard sign with a colourful print. That's all researchers from the Faculty of Engineering Technology at KU Leuven needed to fool a smart camera. To be clear: Wiebe Van Ranst, Simen Thys, and Toon Goedemé from the EAVISE research group don't have evil intentions. Quite the opposite. Their research aims to expose the weaknesses of intelligent detection systems.  "Smart detection systems rely on pattern recognition," says Professor Goedemé, head of EAVISE (Embedded and Artificially Intelligent Vision Engineering) at De Nayer Campus.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.04.2019
New genome analytics platform makes clinical genomics affordable for daily use in hospital
Imec, UZ Leuven, KU Leuven, Ghent University, Agilent, Western Digital and BlueBee develop unique hybrid cloud platform for fast and cost-efficient whole genome sequencing and analysis. Today, on the occasion of the international DNA day, imec, a world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, and its partners revealed their Genome Analytics Platform (GAP) platform, a unique platform that can perform a full genome analysis of 48 samples in only 48 hours and at an acceptable cost.

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